Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m Marcus Hammarberg, a software developer that got interested in how to work effectively together about 2004. This led me to examine and learn from agile, Kanban and lean to find better and better ways. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk is about how we use kanban and lean to save a hospital in Indonesia from ruin (physically and financially). It’s a roller coaster of a story that shows the power of the principles we are using in IT and how they can be applied outside our normal sphere. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Inspiration and deeper understanding of what the principles behind lean and agile. At least they was what I got during the adventures there. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Start by finding The one metric that matters and that the whole organization can rally behind. Make that visual and in-your-face-present for everyone in the org. Start doing fewer things at the same time. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? For starters I think that term Agile soon will grow out of fashion. We will talk about flow or value driven development instead. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Can you sign my arm? Seriously – any question that was not asked because it was deemed “too stupid” is waste. There are...
Interview with James Stewart

Interview with James Stewart

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m James Stewart and I help organisations adapt to the internet era, primarily as a partner with Public Digital. Previously I worked for the UK Government where I was Deputy CTO, helping government deliver great digital services and to change its technology infrastructure so it could focus on user needs. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I’ll be telling the story of the work I did in government. How we helped an old and complex organisation implement massive change, deliver far better services, and begin to recognise that that unit of delivery is the team. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Hopefully our experience will be generally inspiring to people trying to bring about change in complex organisations! But I’ll also offer some practical tips on how to focus your efforts and where to start! Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? In many of the organisations we work with, we see agile being boxed in as purely a software delivery methodology. Most of the time really delivering value requires you to iterate everything together – the software, the processes, even the business model. That can be a lot to think about all at once! So it’s absolutely vital that everyone on the team have a clear sense of purpose, a solid understanding of the value you are trying to deliver and who it is for. Without that you’ll easily get pushed into that box, or get lost along the way. Q: How...
Interview with Jon Kern

Interview with Jon Kern

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I am Jon Kern, aerospace engineer turned software developer. I love designing innovative solutions in software, and trying to build kick ass teams to bring smiles to customers’  faces. I care mostly about the business problem, not shiny new developer gizmos. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? Agile practices work best within a holistic systems engineering framework and a culture of curiosity. There is no magical process for, nor shortcut around, having to use your brain in software development. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? I want folks to leave with some new ways to approach their development projects and new questions with which to challenge themselves and their teams/companies. If you are stuck doing agile in name only, I’ll help get you unstuck. If you are a well-oiled machine, I’ll help realize there is always room for improvement. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Though you might introduce an agile practice (e.g., Scrum), that does not make your team agile in the slightest. It just means you are trying out an agile practice. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? Maybe a return to agile. Even though agile was revolutionary at the time, it has long since been commercialized and diluted and sometimes even perverted. The true individual freedoms espoused in the Manifesto have been lost to better marketing and mass misinformation about easy ways to be agile with a few simple practices. Q: You have...
Interview with Hendrik Esser

Interview with Hendrik Esser

Could you briefly introduce yourself? I am Henrik Esser and I am working as Manager for Special Project at Ericsson. I have more than 20 years of leadership experience in product development, leading small (20 people) to very large (>7000 people) organizations. I am one of the drivers of Ericsson’s enterprise transition. Outside the company I also work as voluntary program director for the Agile Alliance’s Supporting Agile Adoption initiative and I am a frequent speaker at international conferences and company events.   Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I will talk about experiences with the agile transformation at Ericsson. The company is very large and I have seen a lot of things over the years. Working for the Agile Alliance I have met a lot of people from other companies and I see many having similar challenges. So I want to share what we have found: what worked for us, how we approached a successful transformation and also what problems we faced and how we coped with them.   Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Participants will hear about experiences I made myself working in a large transformation over more than 10 years. So they will get a realistic and unfiltered view on how a transformation can be approached and how it can be kept “on track”. I will especially share how we managed to not only spread agile practices, but also an agile mindset – maybe one of the biggest issues in many enterprises.   Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations...
Interview with Xavier Albaladejo

Interview with Xavier Albaladejo

Could you briefly introduce yourself? I work in organizational transformation, change strategy and cultural change, in order to help companies to be simpler, customer centric, more flexible and enjoyable. I coordinate a Master in Agile, I write in a couple of blogs (on Agile and Transformation) and I was co-founder of Agile Spain and Agile Barcelona. I also enjoy hiking, sci-fi and playing the bass guitar.   Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk will be about the “compulsory” organizational re-factoring needed in order to be more Agile. It has a lot of wins but, as any organizational design, it also has flaws and typical issues you should expect (e.g. silo effect in teams, not ready technology base, how to deal with middle management). So, this talk will give some options for dealing with these situations before they get tough.   Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? I will also talk on the non-sense of the “corporate transformation” concept and what to do if you are in this situation.   Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Focus on simplicity and make their people think as if they were “owners” of the company in order to make decisions. For this to be a success, work on growing their skills and give them the needed information to develop the best possible decisions.   Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? I think there is a need to go to the basics of the Agile...
Interview with Gwen Diagram

Interview with Gwen Diagram

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? My name is Gwen Diagram, I’m a Principal Test Engineer at Sky in Leeds, UK.  I’m one of the co-organisers of the Leeds Testing Atelier, a free, twice yearly punk rock testing conference.  I’ve spoken all over Europe and I absolutely adore going to new conferences and meeting new people to talk about Agile with.  I spend a lot of my time working on the Test Atelier, writing talks or helping with other meet ups such as Agile Yorkshire.  I’m currently working on changing the culture in my workplace by holding workshops on testing, pairing and generally trying to get people talking to each other.  I believe with engaged teams you build quality software – and so I’m trying to engage the teams! Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I’m speaking about how one of my old teams in Leeds inherited a project with fragmented, abandoned automation around it.  The automation used so many different frameworks that people couldn’t really run it – and it wasn’t running on any build servers.  From this, we built an automation framework covering multiple testing layers to improve confidence in releasing (and saved us a bunch of time!) We also had to convince the higher ups this was a good thing so I speak about how to sell your ideas to hard to please people. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Ideas on how to build an automation framework that will get the entire team involved – not just testers.  How to get...