Interview with Gunther Verheyen – Scaled Professional Scrum

Interview with Gunther Verheyen – Scaled Professional Scrum

We are very happy to hosting Gunther Verheyen from Scrum.org. Gunther will talk about Scaling Scrum, “Scaled Professional Scrum, it takes two to scale“. Gunther partners with Ken Schwaber and directs the Professional series at Scrum.org. He represents Ken and Scrum.org in Europe. He is creative with the right touch of anarchy. It helps to transcend mediocrity and strive for excellence. Gunther is author of the highly acclaimed book Scrum – A Pocket Guide (A Smart Travel Companion). Here is his small interview. Q: Could you briefly introduce yourself? Hi, I’m Gunther Verheyen, a seasoned Scrum professional. I partner with Ken Schwaber, specifically targetting Europe, and shepherd the Professional series at Scrum.org. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I will introduce “Scaled Professional Scrum (SPS)“, the framework by Scrum.org that describes how to implement Scrum at scale. At the heart of SPS is the Nexus, an exo-skeleton that connects 3-9 Scrum Teams creating one product. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Participants will learn how to scale product development through Scrum, while respecting and even re-enforcing the principles and foundations of Scrum. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organizations that are transitioning to agile? In my session, I start by defining Scaled Scrum as any implementation of Scrum that employs multiple Scrum Teams creating one or multiple (related) products. The organization surrounding such scaled implementation of Scrum is bound to be impacted by this. Scrum’s principles and empiricism can be employed to lead such change, as defined by Scrum.org in the “Agility Path” framework, but it is...
Maximizing Scrum

Maximizing Scrum

Maximizing Scrum -a foundational perspective on ‘scaling Scrum’- Most organizations that have adopted Scrum are caught up in a (mental) race to ‘scale Scrum’. It is worthwhile considering what drives them, and point out the value in understanding and employing Scrum properly first. A Compelling Desire to Scale? Organizations that have been around for a while have grown very complicated and extremely interdependent internal structures. IT and software development work is organized as assembly line work. Many bodies, meetings, hand-overs, resources, deliverables, processes and departments are required in order to produce and release even the smallest chunks of work. Growth in volume and quantity is seen as the only way forward. The internal structures make it very difficult to produce more work and allow such growth. The investment to produce additional work is spent mostly on the structures themselves, not on the actual productive work. The existing structures are the root of the problems organizations seek to resolve by adopting Scrum. It is then fascinating to observe how Scrum is expected to match the existing structures. The reluctance to touch the existing structures results in twisted adoptions of Scrum. The problems impeding increased business agility remain. The benefits to be gained from Scrum quickly crash against organizational limits. The attempts to scale Scrum reflect the past views in which growth was only achievable through larger numbers. The already twisted implementation of Scrum then needs to be scaled to develop more software, faster. The opportunities for organizational healing are lost. The Scalability of Scrum The primary potential of Scrum lies not in enlarging capabilities, in terms of quantity and volume,...