Interview with Elisabeth Hocke

Interview with Elisabeth Hocke

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? My name is Lisi and my Twitter bio says I’m an agile tester, sociotechnical symmathecist, team glue, volleyball player, and game lover which puts it in a nutshell. I’m especially interested in testing, learning and collaboration in agile environments.   Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk is about my personal experience as a tester working at FlixBus. I joined the company nearly three years ago as the second tester overall and found a great place to be. We have faced lots of challenges, have driven lots of improvements, are still doing lots of experiments and learned lots from that. In this talk I will share our insights from a tester’s perspective so others can benefit from our experience.   Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? The main gain is to learn what we tried and what worked in our context to get inspired to drive improvements yourself.   Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? My general advice would be to do many small experiments or probes and to learn from them so you can continuously improve anything that could use improvement. Many people out there tried lots of things where you can get inspiration from, still, you have to try it in your context and see what works for you. Stay open and stay...
Interview with Tony Grout

Interview with Tony Grout

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself?  I’m Tony Grout, and help lead the thinking at Atlassian on how teams of teams can ship better solutions. I’ve worked in industries from military aerospace to collaboration tools at a global scale. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic?   My talk is about five signs your scaling of agility is failing. I chose this topic as I’ve lead some huge agile and devops transformations and have observed many more and see some common failure patterns that I thought it would be sharing; along with some potential solutions. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session?  Increase the likelihood of avoiding the traps I’ve fallen in to or I’ve seen others fall in to when trying to scale agility. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile?  Start small, focus on both engineering excellence and defining value through experimentation making sure to bring the rest of the organisation with you Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future?  Succesful organisations will avoid the trap of adopting a single agile framework. Instead they’ll avoid rhetoric; they’ll be customer focused while not losing sight of responsibilies to society and the people that work in their organisation; they’ll hire smart people; they’ll use data to build insight; encourage experimentation in product and process where it makes sense, value wisdom and manage risk using enabling constraints. We’ll call this something else other than agile so that we get another chance to fix what we didn’t get...
Should the scrum master have technical background?

Should the scrum master have technical background?

Among other things, scrum is very “trendy” lately. Virtually any company that I know of has either adopted it or attempted to do so or at least considered it. The software industry needs change rapidly, evolving the scrum master in one of the most sought after roles. However, the inability of the offer to meet the demand and the absence of required technical skills to become a scrum master has made the role appealing to a number of people outside the industry, giving birth to an ongoing debate. Should the scrum master have a technical background? The scrum guide does not prescribe technical skills as a prerequisite for a scrum master. However, desired qualifications in vacancies range from concrete experience as a software developer to no technical requirements specified at all. Before we endeavor to address the topic, let’s take a step back and think a little bit of Agile. Why do all these people and companies favor Agile over waterfall? After all, waterfall was used for so many successful projects. This can be a surprisingly hard to answer question for a lot of people. In my opinion, the key benefit is the establishment of a short feedback loop. Daily stand-ups, open space offices and loads of sticky notes only serve to alter the process, being merely means to and end. The short feedback loop is an end in itself. Agile suggests that we leave behind the old days when the requirements were specified all upfront and the developers worked isolated for a few months only to deliver software needing change. A very short loop is established, allowing for...
Interview with Giuseppe De Simone

Interview with Giuseppe De Simone

Giuseppe is from Italy. He lives in Sweden and works as Lead Agile coach at one of the Ericsson Product Development Units. He is one of the prominent Agile influencers and we are really happy to have him with us this September. You may be interested to know that Giuseppe  started his Agile journey in Greece, in Patras more specifically. Read more about it in his interview. We are really excited to have him in Agile Greece Summit 2016 and looking forward to his speech. Did you get your ticket? Q: Could you briefly introduce yourself? My name is Giuseppe, I am Italian but I live in Stockholm with my wife and our two kids. I work as Lead Agile coach at one of the Ericsson Product Development Units and I am a member of the Scrum Alliance Certified Enterprise Coaches community. I have been working in product development for 17 years and I have been helping organizations with Lean and Agile transformation since 2009. I am passionate about anything related to agility, primarily Agile leadership, Change management, Software craftsmanship and Coaching. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? The need (and even the urgency for me I would say) to propose my talk comes from the observation of a strident clash. On one side a new world is shaping up, where everything and everyone which benefits of being connected is being connected. Daily innovations, collaboration beyond boundaries, more interdependencies in the eco-systems are profoundly modifying the ability and the way people and enterprises create value. On the other side, many companies are still influenced by management practices invented in 19th century for achieving totally...