Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m Marcus Hammarberg, a software developer that got interested in how to work effectively together about 2004. This led me to examine and learn from agile, Kanban and lean to find better and better ways. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk is about how we use kanban and lean to save a hospital in Indonesia from ruin (physically and financially). It’s a roller coaster of a story that shows the power of the principles we are using in IT and how they can be applied outside our normal sphere. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Inspiration and deeper understanding of what the principles behind lean and agile. At least they was what I got during the adventures there. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Start by finding The one metric that matters and that the whole organization can rally behind. Make that visual and in-your-face-present for everyone in the org. Start doing fewer things at the same time. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? For starters I think that term Agile soon will grow out of fashion. We will talk about flow or value driven development instead. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Can you sign my arm? Seriously – any question that was not asked because it was deemed “too stupid” is waste. There are...
Interview with Dimitar Karaivanov

Interview with Dimitar Karaivanov

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? CEO and co-founder Kanbanize. Portfolio and Scaled Kanban enthusiast, passionate about efficiency at scale and hard rock. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? We see how the agile frameworks rule the space and many people are deceived into adopting them by the book. I believe that each team and company should discover their own framework and continuously develop it. I will share how we discovered ours and why it’s so effective. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Realizing that there are no quick wins and that agility is achieved through hard work. Also, seeing a very interesting approach to scaling agility through hierarchical use of Kanban boards (from the team to the CEO). Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Do not adopt frameworks by the book, or if you do, let that be a temporary solution. The ultimate goal is to create your own framework tailored to your context and needs. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? It’s more and more being recognized as a competitive advantage. Many companies are becoming strategic about agile, realizing that otherwise they will not survive. This will lead to the expansion of the agile and lean principles way beyond engineering. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Not really...
Interview with Klaus Leopold

Interview with Klaus Leopold

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I am computer scientist and Kanban pioneer with many years of experience in helping organizations from different industries on their improvement journey with Lean and Kanban. My main interest is establishing business agility in a very lean and inexpensive way by improving organizations beyond the team level, especially in large environments from 50 to 5000 people. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk is basically a case study about an Agile transition of about 600 people. They introduced Agile methods across the organization but no significant improvement could be seen, although almost all teams were using Agile methods. I will give answers why this is, what we did to improve the performance and what I would do if I would have to choice to start at the beginning. The whole topic is about local sub optimizing an organization by using a team focused approach. That’s what I see in so many Agile transitions where loads of money is burnt without any significant improvements. I love this topic because using a different approach would be so simple! Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Learn pitfalls of Agile transitions so that you can avoid it in your situation. Learn what you can do when you are in an Agile transition which is on the wrong track. Learn how to get business agility in a very lean way with very low budget compared to classical Agile transitions. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Optimize...
Μια μέρα στην χώρα του Kanban (a.k.a One day in Κanban land in Greek)

Μια μέρα στην χώρα του Kanban (a.k.a One day in Κanban land in Greek)

Ένα από τα πιο συνηθισμένα ερωτήματα πλέον στον χώρο του Agile είναι “Τι είναι το Kanban”. Ένας από τους καλύτερους σύντομους οδηγούς είναι το One day in kanban land από τον Henrik Kniberg. O Nίκος Μπατσιος, ενεργό μέλος της ομάδας του Agile Greece είχε την ευγενική διάθεση να κάνει την Ελληνική μετάφραση (σε ελεύθερη απόδοση 🙂 ) Είναι ένα πολύ ωραίο intro για το Kanban. ευχαριστούμε Νίκο. (Twitter / Linkedin). Άλλα ποστ για το Kanban: What is kanban? One of the most common questions around Agile. One of the best explainers though is from “One day in kanban land” of Henrik Kniberg. Nikos Batsios member of Agile Greece was kind to translate it in greek! This is a great visualized intro to understand how Kanban works! Nikos Batsios is Scrum Master at Intracom Telecom and organizer at Agile Greece...
Team Awesomeness

Team Awesomeness

Team Awesomeness, a great way for Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches to facilitate group dynamics and team’s awesomeness. A common goal for our teams at King is to strive to be a high-performance team that communicates and collaborates well both within and outside the team. In that spirit, we are testing a concept that I call “Team Awesomeness”. Generally, it’s a lightweight questionnaire, which the team answers together as an extension to the retrospective. The team fills out a questionnaire with 25 questions divided in five different areas: contribution to King, contribution to the team, innovation, communication, and quality. The team members read each question out loud and then do “fist of five” voting. Those members with the highest and lowest votes should explain their choice. The whole team listens and discusses, then votes again, as in planning poker. The team tries to reach a consensus on a score, makes notes, and then moves to the next question. After going through all the questions, the team should clearly see in which areas it needs to improve. The first Team Awesomeness exercise takes approximately two hours. The exercise offers good input for an improvement theme (see picture). The team can also easily measure progress. Make sure the results are transparent for the whole team, and put the score on your Scrum/kanban board. We don’t tell a team which methods or processes it needs to put in place to strengthen its weak areas; if a team, for example, finds that they need to improve quality, the company doesn’t tell them to fix more bugs or start with TDD. The team must find a solution...
How to Kanban with Trello

How to Kanban with Trello

You hear about Kanban all the time. There are great guides out there but you do not know where to start. Is this the case? I had the same problem too. So I tried to gather some really baby steps of implementing a simple Kanban system for your early development phase. For some time now I worked with Trello. I like the UI (maybe not their latest change) and the overall simplicity of the platform and its free! Want to get a whiteboard? or a SaaS app? draw a Kanban board and the game is on. As the process is gradually changing, we find new useful things to add or things to remove. So in one month this board may not be the same. The most important thing in Kanban is flow! And don’t forget that  in every agile process, the definition of Done is really important!!! everybody in the team should know when something is “done”. Here’s a working example of a Kanban board. You can start by drawing the following columns: Backlog: Put all your ideas there as they come in. This can only be a repo of ideas – either large features (epics) or small user stories.  Big epics though have to be analysed and split in small user stories before they can be put in this column. Planned:  In this column we put user stories from the Backlog that we choose to work with. A good strategy is to have a biweekly meeting with your team to select which features will make it to this column from the Backlog, something very similar with the the Sprint Planning meeting in SCRUM. In my team...