Interview with Hendrik Esser

Interview with Hendrik Esser

Could you briefly introduce yourself? I am Henrik Esser and I am working as Manager for Special Project at Ericsson. I have more than 20 years of leadership experience in product development, leading small (20 people) to very large (>7000 people) organizations. I am one of the drivers of Ericsson’s enterprise transition. Outside the company I also work as voluntary program director for the Agile Alliance’s Supporting Agile Adoption initiative and I am a frequent speaker at international conferences and company events.   Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I will talk about experiences with the agile transformation at Ericsson. The company is very large and I have seen a lot of things over the years. Working for the Agile Alliance I have met a lot of people from other companies and I see many having similar challenges. So I want to share what we have found: what worked for us, how we approached a successful transformation and also what problems we faced and how we coped with them.   Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Participants will hear about experiences I made myself working in a large transformation over more than 10 years. So they will get a realistic and unfiltered view on how a transformation can be approached and how it can be kept “on track”. I will especially share how we managed to not only spread agile practices, but also an agile mindset – maybe one of the biggest issues in many enterprises.   Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations...
Agile: The end of innocence

Agile: The end of innocence

A study by 6point6 on April 2017, based on a survey o 300 CIOs (average company size: 1,300 people) shows that the perception of Agile is changing. CIOs are often disillusioned, finding (usually the hard way) that some (12%) agile projects fail completely, that Agile is not easy to scale, and that distributed agile teams are often underperforming. This is good news. Agile never was, and never will be a silver bullet. Struggles with Agile adoption and a decent share of failures, show us that Agile will work only when carefully customized for the specific organization. This should shift our focus from advocating Agile to making it work – without expecting/demanding that the organization changes its culture overnight to become ‘Agile’. Established Agile scaling Frameworks such as SAFe can help with that. The age of agile innocence is ending. Finally. The report For the massive effect it has had on the software industry, there are surprisingly few industry reports analyzing the extend of Agile adoption*, compared to Waterfall, the older standard. Moreover, we have little data on the perceived success of the adoption efforts. Is Agile considered successful by the companies adopting it, after all? Most reference reports (such as the ‘State of Agile’ or the ‘State of Scrum’) base their data on surveys conducted on people already interested in or practicing Agile, a fact which obviously limits the sample and creates a strong positive bias towards Agile. This report published recently by 6point6 (a UK consultancy), tried to measure the perception of Agile success and the most common adoption roadblocks, by conducting a study on 300 CIOs, half in the...