Agile: The end of innocence

Agile: The end of innocence

A study by 6point6 on April 2017, based on a survey o 300 CIOs (average company size: 1,300 people) shows that the perception of Agile is changing. CIOs are often disillusioned, finding (usually the hard way) that some (12%) agile projects fail completely, that Agile is not easy to scale, and that distributed agile teams are often underperforming. This is good news. Agile never was, and never will be a silver bullet. Struggles with Agile adoption and a decent share of failures, show us that Agile will work only when carefully customized for the specific organization. This should shift our focus from advocating Agile to making it work – without expecting/demanding that the organization changes its culture overnight to become ‘Agile’. Established Agile scaling Frameworks such as SAFe can help with that. The age of agile innocence is ending. Finally. The report For the massive effect it has had on the software industry, there are surprisingly few industry reports analyzing the extend of Agile adoption*, compared to Waterfall, the older standard. Moreover, we have little data on the perceived success of the adoption efforts. Is Agile considered successful by the companies adopting it, after all? Most reference reports (such as the ‘State of Agile’ or the ‘State of Scrum’) base their data on surveys conducted on people already interested in or practicing Agile, a fact which obviously limits the sample and creates a strong positive bias towards Agile. This report published recently by 6point6 (a UK consultancy), tried to measure the perception of Agile success and the most common adoption roadblocks, by conducting a study on 300 CIOs, half in the...