Interview with  Linda Rising

Interview with Linda Rising

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee, in the US. I’m interested in the brain, how we think, solve problems, make decisions. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? The title of the talk is “Overcoming resistance” and addresses one of the most important issues we face today. How to communicate ideas to people who disagree with us. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? We tend to believe that if you can just outline the reasons for our stance that others, if they are intelligent, will see our point of view and adopt it. What scientific evidence shows is –this is a bias–we are not convinced by argument. In fact, it’s very difficult to convince others to change. What is effective is to be open to listening and learning and possibly changing ourselves. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Don’t expect major change to happen overnight. Don’t expect to see the hyped benefits that others might report. Take small steps and learn. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? Agile is the name for a step along the way. It has already changed from its inception. I started doing Scrum in the mid-1990s. Scrum now is very different. The fact that agile has changed and continues to change means that it is really “agile.” That is its future — change. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have...
Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m Marcus Hammarberg, a software developer that got interested in how to work effectively together about 2004. This led me to examine and learn from agile, Kanban and lean to find better and better ways. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk is about how we use kanban and lean to save a hospital in Indonesia from ruin (physically and financially). It’s a roller coaster of a story that shows the power of the principles we are using in IT and how they can be applied outside our normal sphere. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Inspiration and deeper understanding of what the principles behind lean and agile. At least they was what I got during the adventures there. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Start by finding The one metric that matters and that the whole organization can rally behind. Make that visual and in-your-face-present for everyone in the org. Start doing fewer things at the same time. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? For starters I think that term Agile soon will grow out of fashion. We will talk about flow or value driven development instead. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Can you sign my arm? Seriously – any question that was not asked because it was deemed “too stupid” is waste. There are...
Interview with Richard Mironov

Interview with Richard Mironov

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? 30 year product management veteran of Silicon Valley software companies, including 6 startups.  I coach product leaders at commercial software companies, and sometimes parachute into companies as interim/temporary Head of Product. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? Critical need for product managers/product owners to directly validate their problem statements and requirements.  Everywhere I go worldwide, I see teams building products or features that fail in the marketplace, because they didn’t do enough direct interviewing/validation/analysis with actual end users — before starting the development cycle.  Huge waste as teams try to dig out of poor assumptions and bad information from proxies. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Separate productivity improvements of agile (build things well, often faster) from lean validation/customer discovery work (deeply understand user/customer needs, then build the right thing).  Most agile discussions assume (incorrectly) that we are building the right things, with the right priorities, and have a plan to measure outcomes. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Keep a focus on real end user value (do they use our products? how do they measure value?  how do we know we are building the right things?) as well as process improvements (quality, velocity, estimation, retrospectives). Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? Every team I meet (anywhere in the world) tells me that they are “agile.”  On inspection, this is usually just a standup or Jira backlog or release cadence… missing all of the goodness of...
Interview with James Stewart

Interview with James Stewart

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m James Stewart and I help organisations adapt to the internet era, primarily as a partner with Public Digital. Previously I worked for the UK Government where I was Deputy CTO, helping government deliver great digital services and to change its technology infrastructure so it could focus on user needs. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I’ll be telling the story of the work I did in government. How we helped an old and complex organisation implement massive change, deliver far better services, and begin to recognise that that unit of delivery is the team. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Hopefully our experience will be generally inspiring to people trying to bring about change in complex organisations! But I’ll also offer some practical tips on how to focus your efforts and where to start! Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? In many of the organisations we work with, we see agile being boxed in as purely a software delivery methodology. Most of the time really delivering value requires you to iterate everything together – the software, the processes, even the business model. That can be a lot to think about all at once! So it’s absolutely vital that everyone on the team have a clear sense of purpose, a solid understanding of the value you are trying to deliver and who it is for. Without that you’ll easily get pushed into that box, or get lost along the way. Q: How...
Interview with Dimitar Karaivanov

Interview with Dimitar Karaivanov

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? CEO and co-founder Kanbanize. Portfolio and Scaled Kanban enthusiast, passionate about efficiency at scale and hard rock. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? We see how the agile frameworks rule the space and many people are deceived into adopting them by the book. I believe that each team and company should discover their own framework and continuously develop it. I will share how we discovered ours and why it’s so effective. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Realizing that there are no quick wins and that agility is achieved through hard work. Also, seeing a very interesting approach to scaling agility through hierarchical use of Kanban boards (from the team to the CEO). Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Do not adopt frameworks by the book, or if you do, let that be a temporary solution. The ultimate goal is to create your own framework tailored to your context and needs. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? It’s more and more being recognized as a competitive advantage. Many companies are becoming strategic about agile, realizing that otherwise they will not survive. This will lead to the expansion of the agile and lean principles way beyond engineering. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Not really...
Interview with Jon Kern

Interview with Jon Kern

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I am Jon Kern, aerospace engineer turned software developer. I love designing innovative solutions in software, and trying to build kick ass teams to bring smiles to customers’  faces. I care mostly about the business problem, not shiny new developer gizmos. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? Agile practices work best within a holistic systems engineering framework and a culture of curiosity. There is no magical process for, nor shortcut around, having to use your brain in software development. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? I want folks to leave with some new ways to approach their development projects and new questions with which to challenge themselves and their teams/companies. If you are stuck doing agile in name only, I’ll help get you unstuck. If you are a well-oiled machine, I’ll help realize there is always room for improvement. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Though you might introduce an agile practice (e.g., Scrum), that does not make your team agile in the slightest. It just means you are trying out an agile practice. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? Maybe a return to agile. Even though agile was revolutionary at the time, it has long since been commercialized and diluted and sometimes even perverted. The true individual freedoms espoused in the Manifesto have been lost to better marketing and mass misinformation about easy ways to be agile with a few simple practices. Q: You have...