Should the scrum master have technical background?

Should the scrum master have technical background?

Among other things, scrum is very “trendy” lately. Virtually any company that I know of has either adopted it or attempted to do so or at least considered it. The software industry needs change rapidly, evolving the scrum master in one of the most sought after roles. However, the inability of the offer to meet the demand and the absence of required technical skills to become a scrum master has made the role appealing to a number of people outside the industry, giving birth to an ongoing debate. Should the scrum master have a technical background? The scrum guide does not prescribe technical skills as a prerequisite for a scrum master. However, desired qualifications in vacancies range from concrete experience as a software developer to no technical requirements specified at all. Before we endeavor to address the topic, let’s take a step back and think a little bit of Agile. Why do all these people and companies favor Agile over waterfall? After all, waterfall was used for so many successful projects. This can be a surprisingly hard to answer question for a lot of people. In my opinion, the key benefit is the establishment of a short feedback loop. Daily stand-ups, open space offices and loads of sticky notes only serve to alter the process, being merely means to and end. The short feedback loop is an end in itself. Agile suggests that we leave behind the old days when the requirements were specified all upfront and the developers worked isolated for a few months only to deliver software needing change. A very short loop is established, allowing for...