Interview with Tony Grout

Interview with Tony Grout

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself?  I’m Tony Grout, and help lead the thinking at Atlassian on how teams of teams can ship better solutions. I’ve worked in industries from military aerospace to collaboration tools at a global scale. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic?   My talk is about five signs your scaling of agility is failing. I chose this topic as I’ve lead some huge agile and devops transformations and have observed many more and see some common failure patterns that I thought it would be sharing; along with some potential solutions. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session?  Increase the likelihood of avoiding the traps I’ve fallen in to or I’ve seen others fall in to when trying to scale agility. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile?  Start small, focus on both engineering excellence and defining value through experimentation making sure to bring the rest of the organisation with you Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future?  Succesful organisations will avoid the trap of adopting a single agile framework. Instead they’ll avoid rhetoric; they’ll be customer focused while not losing sight of responsibilies to society and the people that work in their organisation; they’ll hire smart people; they’ll use data to build insight; encourage experimentation in product and process where it makes sense, value wisdom and manage risk using enabling constraints. We’ll call this something else other than agile so that we get another chance to fix what we didn’t get...
Interview with Alison Coward

Interview with Alison Coward

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself?  Alison Coward, founder of Bracket, and author of A Pocket Guide to Effective Workshops. Bracket is a consultancy that helps creative and digital teams work better together. I’m a workshop facilitator and I’ve been working in and leading creative teams for more than 15 years. I’m passionate about finding the perfect balance between creativity and productivity, helping teams to use the best of their talents to develop great ideas and make them happen. I’ve worked with clients across many sectors from Fortune 500 companies to startups. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? Designing a high-performing team We all need to work in teams to solve complex problems, innovate and create great products. Yet effective collaboration remains a challenge for many. How can we make the most of the collective expertise in a team, whilst ensuring that each person can work in a way that enables them to do their best work? In this talk Alison will share her insights on characteristics of high-performing teams, principles for designing an effective team culture and how to create good team habits that stick.   Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Starting to think more intentionally about how to create the environment for everyone in their team to do their best work together. There will be practical tips as well as broader ideas to get them thinking differently about how they approach teamwork. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile?  I’m not an agile expert ?   Q: You have given...
Interview with Dave Snowden

Interview with Dave Snowden

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? Dave Snowden – I’m CSO of Cognitive Edge and Director of the Cynefin Centre.   Cognitive Edge is a commercial company building methods and training as well as the SenseMaker® product range.  The Cynefin Centre is an R&D base focused on Government and NGO programmes Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? I’ll be talking about Complexity and uncertainty and how to navigate it.  That will include the latest version of my Cynefin framework and ideas on ‘pre-scrum’ techniques within Agile and non-linear approaches to design thinking Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Ways to reduce the risk on projects. and understanding that uncertainty is often a good thin and should be navigated not eliminated.  New methods and techniques Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Do it in small stages building on your current strenghts – think transition not transformation.  Avoid the big scaling frameworks at all costs, don’t abandon non-Agile methods they still have a role Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? Increasing commodification so we need to think hard about how we restore some of the original vision before its toolate. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Absolutely, I’m still waiting for...
Interview with  Linda Rising

Interview with Linda Rising

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee, in the US. I’m interested in the brain, how we think, solve problems, make decisions. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? The title of the talk is “Overcoming resistance” and addresses one of the most important issues we face today. How to communicate ideas to people who disagree with us. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? We tend to believe that if you can just outline the reasons for our stance that others, if they are intelligent, will see our point of view and adopt it. What scientific evidence shows is –this is a bias–we are not convinced by argument. In fact, it’s very difficult to convince others to change. What is effective is to be open to listening and learning and possibly changing ourselves. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Don’t expect major change to happen overnight. Don’t expect to see the hyped benefits that others might report. Take small steps and learn. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? Agile is the name for a step along the way. It has already changed from its inception. I started doing Scrum in the mid-1990s. Scrum now is very different. The fact that agile has changed and continues to change means that it is really “agile.” That is its future — change. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have...
Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Interview with Marcus Hammarberg

Q. Could you briefly introduce yourself? I’m Marcus Hammarberg, a software developer that got interested in how to work effectively together about 2004. This led me to examine and learn from agile, Kanban and lean to find better and better ways. Q: What will your talk be about, exactly? Why this topic? My talk is about how we use kanban and lean to save a hospital in Indonesia from ruin (physically and financially). It’s a roller coaster of a story that shows the power of the principles we are using in IT and how they can be applied outside our normal sphere. Q: What do you think could be the main gain for participants in your session? Inspiration and deeper understanding of what the principles behind lean and agile. At least they was what I got during the adventures there. Q: Can you give some advice to teams/organisations that are transitioning to agile? Start by finding The one metric that matters and that the whole organization can rally behind. Make that visual and in-your-face-present for everyone in the org. Start doing fewer things at the same time. Q: How do you see the evolution of agile in the future? For starters I think that term Agile soon will grow out of fashion. We will talk about flow or value driven development instead. Q: You have given many interviews/presentations about agile. Is there a question you wish to have been asked but no one ever asked you? Can you sign my arm? Seriously – any question that was not asked because it was deemed “too stupid” is waste. There are...